The Law Office of Julie M. Weiner

Georgia Employment Attorney​

Serving The Legal Needs Of Employers And Individuals Since 2000

Advocate for the Legal Rights of GA Employees​

In Georgia, most employment relationships are considered "at will."   This means, as a general rule, that an employer can terminate a person's employment for any reason or no reason at all.   Of course, there are exceptions to this rule, but they are not always obvious.  That is why you need an experienced plaintiff's employment lawyer to evaluate your situation to see if you have any viable claims under state or federal law.

Here are some things to consider when deciding whether you need a consultation with an employment lawyer:

  • Do you believe you have been treated differently by your employer or subjected to a hostile work environment because of a protected characteristic  (i.e., age, gender, race, national origin, religion, pregnancy, genetic information, disability, or association with a disabled individual)?

  • Were you sexually harassed in the workplace?

  • Do you think you were not selected for a position because of a protected characteristic?
 
  • Do you think you were retaliated against for engaging in "protected activity"?

  • Did you suffer an adverse employment action after complaining about​ being treatedly differently or experiencing a hostile work environment because of a protected characteristic?
​​
  • Did you suffer an adverse employment action after you participated as  a witness to someone else's claim of unlawful discrimination, harassment or retaliation?

  • Did you suffer an adverse employment action after taking or requesting to take FMLA leave?

  • Did you suffer an adverse employment action related to taking military leave?

  • Did you suffer an adverse employment action after complaining about minimum wage or overtime issues?

  • Did you suffer an adverse employment action because you attended a court ordered proceeding (deposition, trial, etc.) or served on jury duty?​

  • Are you a government employee (city, state or local) who suffered an adverse employment action after you reported violations of laws, regulations or rules by your agency?

  • ​Did your employer interfere with your right to take FMLA leave?

  • Were you paid everything you were entitled to receive?

  • Was your job misclassified as "exempt" from overtime?

  • Did your employer pay you for all hours worked at the proper rate?

  • Are you due commissions?

  • Did your employer breach a written contract with you?



While these questions are not an exhaustive list of scenarios under which an employee may have legal claims against an employer, they give you an idea of some specific circumstances that can give rise to recognized employment-related claims. For further information, take a look at the " helpful links" section of this web site.  You can also use the " request a consultation" link, and you will receive an email with questions to see if my firm can assist you, or provide a referral.